Effect of resveratrol on glucose control and insulin sensitivity

Effect of resveratrol on glucose control and insulin sensitivity

A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of resveratrol on glucose control and insulin sensitivity.

Resveratrol consumption significantly reduced fasting glucose, insulin, glycated haemoglobin, and insulin resistance levels in participants with diabetes. There was no significant effect of resveratrol on glycaemic measures on nondiabetic participants.

Resveratrol significantly improved glucose control and insulin sensitivity in persons with diabetes but did not affect glycaemic measures in nondiabetic persons. Additional high-quality studies are needed to further evaluate the potential benefits of resveratrol in humans.

Am J Clin Nutr. June 2014. vol. 99 no. 6, 1510-1519.

Obesity and other noncommunicable disease risk factors are increasing in low- and middle-income countries

Vorster and colleagues assessed the relationship between added sugar intake and noncommunicable disease risk factors in an African cohort study. Added sugars were defined as all monosaccharides and di-saccharides added to foods and beverages during processing, cooking, and at the table.

The study was a 5-year follow-up of a cohort of 2010 urban and rural men and women aged 30–70 y of age at recruitment in 2005 from the North West Province in South Africa.

Added sugar intake, particularly in rural areas, has increased rapidly in the past 5 years. In rural areas, the proportion of adults who consumed sucrose-sweetened beverages approximately doubled (for men, from 25% to 56%; for women, from 33% to 63%) in the past 5 years.

This cohort showed dramatic increases in added sugars and sucrose-sweetened beverage consumption in both urban and rural areas. Increased consumption was associated with increased noncommunicable disease risk factors. In addition, the study showed that the nutrition transition has reached a remote rural area in South Africa. Urgent action is needed to address these trends.

Am J Clin Nutr. June 2014, vol. 99 no. 6, 1479-1486.

Gluten may cause depression in subjects with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity

Gluten, the major protein of wheat, has been established as the causative agent in the development of coeliac disease, characterised by small intestinal injury and immunological activation. Gluten has also been implicated as a causal factor in the development of chronic functional gastrointestinal symptoms similar to those classified as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Twenty-two subjects (24–62 years, five male) with irritable bowel syndrome who had coeliac disease excluded but were symptomatically controlled on a gluten free diet (GFD), undertook a double-blind cross-over study. Participants randomly received one of three dietary challenges for 3 days, followed by a minimum 3-day washout before crossing over to the next diet. Challenge gluten-free food was supplemented with gluten (16 g/day), whey (16 g/day) or not supplemented (placebo).

Gluten ingestion was associated with higher overall state depression scores compared to placebo [P = 0.010].

Short-term exposure to gluten specifically induced current feelings of depression. Such findings might explain why patients with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity feel better on a gluten-free diet despite the continuation of gastrointestinal symptoms.

Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2014; 39: 1104–1112.

Herbal teas are on their way… Update 3

Another update on the herbal teas. I’m going to go with Dr B’s Herbal Teas 🙂 . Things have been very busy here with work so I have delayed the teas a bit. Working on the dream. Stay tuned for exciting news.

PS. Happy St Patrick’s Day

The influence of diet and nutrients on platelet function

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Platelet activation and aggregation play an integral role in hemostasis and thrombosis.

Diets and nutrients play a potential role in modifying cardiovascular disease progression, particularly in platelet function, and have the potential of altering platelet function tests. Diets such as Mediterranean diet, high in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and vegetarian diets have inverse relationships with cardiovascular disease. Dark chocolate, foods with low glycemic index, garlic, ginger, omega-3 PUFA, onion, purple grape juice, tomato, and wine all reduce platelet aggregation. Dark chocolate and omega-3 PUFA also reduce P-selectin expression. In addition, dark chocolate reduces PAC-1 binding and platelet microparticle formation. Berries inhibit platelet function (PFA-100). Energy drinks have been shown to increase platelet aggregation and caffeine increases platelet microparticle formation.

Therefore, repeat testing of platelet function may be required, not only after exclusion of known antiplatelet medications but also potentially after exclusion of dietary substances/nutrients that could have plausibly affected initial test data.

McEwen BJ. The Influence of Diet and Nutrients on Platelet Function. Semin Thromb Hemost. 2014 Mar;40(2):214-26. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24497119)

Herbal teas are on their way… Update 2

An update (number 2) on the herbal teas. I’m thinking of naming the brand “Dr Brad’s teas” or “Dr B’s Teas” or similar. My friends call be Dr B, so I might go with that…

Herbal teas are on their way… Update

I’ve always seen food as medicine and herbal teas play a very big role in supporting and improving health. I have used herbal teas in my clinic for many years. During high school I did a subject in business that allowed me to work under a herbalist in a health food store. This experience brought forward my love of herbal teas.

I have graduated with my PhD at the University of Sydney (yesterday). Yay! It was a beautiful day with family and friends. I am getting back to creating the herbal tea brand that I talked about a while ago. Sorry about the delay. The herbal teas will be available in the future. The herbal teas will be certified organic. I’m very excited about this. I’m thinking of a catchy name. Stay tuned…

Effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on platelet function in healthy subjects and subjects with cardiovascular disease

Hyperactivation and aggregation of platelets play a major role in thrombosis and hemostasis. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on platelet function. Light transmission aggregometry and flow cytometric analyses of platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregates were determined at baseline and after 4 weeks of omega-3 (docosahexaenoic acid 520 mg and eicosapentaenoic acid 120 mg) supplementation.

In total, 40 healthy subjects and 16 patients with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) completed the study. In healthy subjects, omega-3 PUFA significantly reduced adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced (maximum amplitude, 77.0% ± 3.2% vs. 71.6% ± 3.4%, p = 0.036; maximum slope, 86.3 ± 1.8 vs. 80.7 ± 2.1, p = 0.014) and adrenaline-induced platelet aggregation (maximum slope, 42.8 ± 2.7 vs. 37.4 ± 3.0, p = 0.013; lag time, 00:21 ± 00:02 vs. 00:31 ± 00:03 s, p = 0.002). Omega-3 PUFA also reduced P-selectin expression (40.5% ± 2.9% vs. 34.4% ± 2.4%, p = 0.049) on platelets and platelet-monocyte aggregates (38.5% ± 2.6% vs. 31.4% ± 2.5%, p = 0.022) after activation with ADP 0.5 µM. There were fewer changes in platelet aggregation and activation found in subjects with CVD. Nevertheless, there was a reduction in the slope of arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation (13.21 ± 6.41 vs. 4.88 ± 3.01, p = 0.009) and increased lag time for U46619 (00:16 ± 00:00 vs. 00:29 ± 00:07 s, p = 0.018) induced platelet aggregation.

Thus, 4-week supplementation of 640 mg omega-3 PUFA reduced measures of platelet aggregation and activation in healthy subjects but effects were less evident in patients with existing CVD. Our findings support the recommendation that the omega-3 PUFA dose be higher in CVD than among healthy subjects.

McEwen BJ, Morel-Kopp MC, Chen W, Tofler GH, Ward CM. Effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on platelet function in healthy subjects and subjects with cardiovascular disease. Semin Thromb Hemost. 2013 Feb;39(1):25-32. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23329646)

Pyrrole Disorder update

Pyrrole disorder can be described as a complex disorder. The causes of pyrrole disorder are not completely understood. There has been an influx of people with potential pyrrole disorder in clinic in the last year or so, especially since the website post last year.

All humans excrete small quantities of hydroxyhemopyrrolin-2’one (HPL) in urine. The level of HPL is tested via a urine test. The level of HPL increases with physical or emotional stress. Elevated HPL has been observed in people with depression. Some laboratories have set the normal concentration of HPL in urine as less than 25 μg/dL. However, practitioners may associate HPL levels twice that amount as being elevated.

The signs and symptoms of pyrrole disorder are similar to that of vitamin B6 and zinc deficiency. The HPL molecule can bind up zinc and vitamin B6 and excrete them, leading to a deficiency.

Hopefully research will provide more information about Pyrrole Disorder the next few years. One of my aims is to conduct clinical trials investigating the levels of HPL and mental health, especially in depression and anxiety, and cardiometabolic disease.

Pyrrole Disorder

Pyrrole disorder can be described as a complex disorder. The causes of pyrrole disorder are not completely understood.

All humans excrete small quantities of hydroxyhemopyrrolin-2’one (HPL) in urine. The level of HPL increases with physical or emotional stress. Some laboratories have set the normal concentration of HPL in urine as 2 to 25 μg/dL. However, practitioners may associate HPL levels twice that amount as being elevated.

The signs and symptoms of pyrrole disorder are similar to that of vitamin B6 and zinc deficiency.

Hopefully research will provide more information about Pyrrole Disorder the next few years.

Effect of omega-3 fish oil on cardiovascular risk in diabetes

PURPOSE:

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease are major public health concerns worldwide and are leading causes of morbidity and mortality. People with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Diet has a substantial affect on the progression of many diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and arthritis. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids [LC-PUFA]) have long been attributed to the maintenance of health and may be of benefit in reducing cardiovascular risk. The purpose of this review is to investigate the possible roles of omega-3 in reducing cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes.

 METHODS:

A literature search was conducted from the Medline, EBSCO, and EMBASE databases. Articles that addressed diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or omega-3 were included.

 RESULTS:

Reviews and studies reported an association with fish and omega-3 LC-PUFA consumption and decreased total cardiovascular mortality (approximately 15%-19%), along with decreased platelet activation and aggregation, improved lipid profiles, including reduction of triglycerides and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), decreased inflammation, and lowered blood pressure.

 CONCLUSION:

Diets higher in fish and omega-3 LC-PUFA may reduce cardiovascular risk in diabetes by inhibiting platelet aggregation, improving lipid profiles, and reducing cardiovascular mortality. Fish and omega-3 LC-PUFA can be recommended to people with diabetes and included into a diabetes management program.

McEwen B, Morel-Kopp MC, Tofler G, Ward C. Effect of omega-3 fish oil on cardiovascular risk in diabetes. Diabetes Educ. 2010 Jul-Aug;36(4):565-84. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20534874)

Herbal teas are on their way

I’ve always seen food as medicine and herbal teas play a very big role in supporting and improving health. I have used herbal teas and combinations of loose herbal teas in my clinic for many years. During high school I did a subject in business that allowed me to work under a herbalist in a health food store. This experience brought forward my love of herbal teas.

I’ve just started a PhD at the University of Sydney. I will be researching the effects of fish oil (omega-3) in cardiovascular disease. It’s going to be a lot of work, but I’m really looking forward to it. Food as medicine 🙂 .

I am currently creating a herbal tea brand that will be available in the future. I am going to try to have the herbal teas certified organic. I’m very excited about this. A dream coming true. Stay tuned…