World chocolate day

Today is world chocolate day. Chocolate and cacao have numerous health benefits. Too many to name here 😉I recommend chocolate, especially high cacao, every day! Enjoy life!

The impact of diet on cardiometabolic syndrome

Optimum nutrition plays the major role in optimum health. Cardiometabolic syndrome is a disease of unhealthy diet and lifestyle. It is a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, including elevated triglyceride levels, fasting plasma glucose level (hyperglycaemia), elevated blood pressure, increased waist circumference, and reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level. It is a multifactorial risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Cardiometabolic syndrome is generally regarded as a pro-inflammatory and prothrombotic state. Inflammation drives insulin resistance and oxidative stress, further amplifying cardiometabolic syndrome.

There are numerous health consequences related to cardiometabolic syndrome; these include non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, obesity, overweight, high adiposity, reproductive dysfunction, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and obstructive sleep apnoea.

Diet and nutrition play major roles in the prevention and management of chronic disease, especially cardiometabolic syndrome. The Westernised diet (high in sugar, saturated fat, fried foods, refined grains) has numerous negative effects on the parameters of cardiometabolic syndrome.

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A predominantly plant-based, Mediterranean-style, low-glycaemic index diet and diets higher in fruits, vegetables, fibre, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, tree nuts, and potassium have been associated with a lower risk of cardiometabolic syndrome. Additionally, the Palaeolithic diet has beneficial effects in the management of cardiometabolic syndrome.

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McEwen B. The impact of diet on cardiometabolic syndrome, J ATMS, 2018; 24(2): 72-77.

The importance of minerals for cognitive development in children

Optimum nutrition is fundamental for the development of a child’s full potential and there are studies that link chronic undernutrition and micronutrient deficiency to cognitive deficits.[1]

Undernutrition has been shown to negatively impact various developmental and cognitive areas including motor development, language functioning, intelligent quotient (IQ), as well as memory and executive functions.[2] The brain needs nutrients to build and maintain its structure.[3]

Minerals, particularly iron and selenium, play major roles in cognitive development and maintenance. Further research is suggested to investigate the effects of nutrition, particularly minerals, for cognitive development and maintenance in children.

Click the link below for more information. FX Medicine:

https://www.fxmedicine.com.au/content/importance-minerals-cognitive-development-children

The Palaeolithic diet and cardiometabolic syndrome

The Palaeolithic diet and cardiometabolic syndrome: Can an ancient diet be the way of the future?

Diet and nutrition play major roles in the prevention and management of chronic disease, especially cardiometabolic syndrome.

Cardiometabolic syndrome has numerous risk factors, including increased waist circumference, elevated blood pressure, elevated triglyceride level, low HDL cholesterol, elevated fasting plasma glucose, chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and a prothrombotic state. There are numerous adverse health conditions related to metabolic syndrome, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Palaeolithic diet may be associated with lower levels of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. Palaeolithic nutrition improved risk factors for chronic disease, such as improvements in waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose levels.

I ask the following question: can an ancient diet be the way of the future? Time will tell…

McEwen BJ. The Palaeolithic diet and cardiometabolic syndrome: Can an ancient diet be the way of the future?, Advances in Integrative Medicine, 2018 Apr, 5(1): 38-40. (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212958818300144)

Good health starts in the gut

Good health starts in the gut. To quote Hippocrates, “all disease begins in the gut”!

I highly recommend The complete gut health cookbook by @chefpeteevans and @helenpadarin . A highly essential guide to improving the health of the digestive system and beyond. Did you know that there are direct links between the gut, the brain, and the immune system?

This book contains information on:

✅ understanding gut healing

✅ foods to heal the gut

✅ digestion and intestinal permeability

✅ autoimmune paleo protocol

✅ 100+ recipes for gut health

✅ 4 week meal plan

✅ nutritional advice

✅ plus more…

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Açai: the superfood antioxidant power punch

The superfood antioxidant power punch 🥊 any time of the day.

Açai is a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. Combine Açai with seasonal fruit, kiwi, banana, strawberries, berries, chia seeds, coconut, nuts, seeds, and granola = awesome!

This is my “go to” for breakfast or snack, or any time of the day, actually. Highly nutritious, packed full of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, and tastes great.

Optimum nutrition leads to optimum health!

Enjoy your day 😎

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Believe in yourself

If you want it you got it. You just got to believe in yourself. Wise words to follow from the great philosopher Lenny Kravitz.

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Believe in yourself. Any time you feel stressed, sit back, close your eyes, and look within. Know that you can do it.

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Pyrrole Disorder webinar: Part 1. Background, Pathophysiology, Signs and Symptoms

Pyrrole disorder is a complex disorder with numerous signs and symptoms.

Although Pyrrole Disorder is not a new health condition, there has been a large influx of information and misinformation in recent years leading to confusion of the signs, symptoms, and treatment.

This comprehensive webinar will enable practitioners to greatly expand their scope of understanding of the diagnosis, pathophysiology and clinical signs of pyrrole disorder.

This webinar will benefit new and established practitioners as well as students to consolidate their learning.

Pyrrole Disorder: Part 1. Details the background, pathophysiology, signs and symptoms of Pyrrole Disorder

When: Tuesday, 22nd May 2018

What Time: 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm AEST

Where: Online

Webinar through Australian Traditional-Medicine Society (ATMS).

Registration:
https://login.redbackconferencing.com.au/landers/page/24b6bb

Nail Diagnosis webinar – 21 May 2018

Nails often reflect the general state of health and wellbeing of a person. It is known that systemic disease/s can produce changes in the nails. Detailed examination of the fingernails can provide indications of nutritional deficiencies and potential underlying systemic diseases.

This comprehensive webinar will enable practitioners to greatly expand their skills and knowledge in the use of nail diagnosis in clinical practice. This webinar also aims to improve the skills of clinical examination in relation to nutritional deficiencies. This informative webinar will also be beneficial to students to consolidate their learning. PDF notes are included with the webinar.

Topics covered:
– Nail anatomy
– Nail signs (causes, nutritional deficiencies, clinical prescribing)
– Conditions and related nail signs
– Tissue salts/Celloids

Learning outcomes:
– Identify and describe nail signs
– Identify potential nutritional deficiencies in relation to nail signs and clinical examination
– Identify health conditions related to nail signs

Link to Nail Diagnosis webinar registration:

https://events.redbackconferencing.com.au/9e9f72

Link to other webinars:

https://www.facebook.com/optimum.mentoring/

Optimum nutrition is the foundation of all health and wellbeing

Optimum nutrition is the foundation of all health and wellbeing.

Diet and nutrition play major roles in the prevention and management of chronic disease.

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Eat colourful foods daily:

– black: blackberries, grapes, black sesame seeds, nori, kelp

– blue: blueberries, plums, berries

– green: apple, avocado, broccoli, beans, spinach, cucumber, celery, peas, kiwi fruit, capsicum, lime, grapes

– orange: apricot, carrots, oranges, mango, mandarin, sweet potato, pumpkin, papaya, peaches

– purple: acai berries, grapes, red cabbage, eggplant, purple carrot

– red: apple, capsicum, cherries, goji berries, guava, strawberries, tomatoes, watermelon

– white: cauliflower, garlic, onions, mushrooms, pears, nuts, sesame seeds

– yellow: banana, capsicum, corn, lemon, pineapple, squash

– chocolate: has its own category if goodness

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Eat a minimum of 5-6 serves of vegetables and 2 serves of fruit per day.

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– Consume nuts (e.g. almonds, cashews, walnuts) daily

– Consume seeds (e.g. chia, flaxseed) daily

– Celery and carrot sticks with hummus makes a great snack

– Consume 1.5-2 L of water daily

– Drink green tea

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Limit or reduce the following:

– saturated fat

– added salt

– refined carbohydrates and sugars

– added sugars

– sugar-sweetened beverages

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Diets higher in fruits, vegetables, fibre, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, tree nuts, and potassium have been associated with a lower risk of cardiometabolic syndrome. Improving the diet should be the foundation of any management plan of cardiometabolic syndrome and chronic disease.

Mothers are very special

Mothers are very special. There are no words that describe their unconditional love. Today is Mother’s Day, but everyday is their day for you. Spoil her today with her favourite treats…

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Nail Diagnosis webinar

Physical examination plays a fundamental role in determining the treatment and management options of patients in naturopathy and nutritional medicine clinical practice. Nails often reflect the general state of health and wellbeing of a person. It is known that systemic disease/s can produce changes in the nails. Detailed examination of the fingernails can provide indications of nutritional deficiencies and potential underlying systemic diseases.

This comprehensive webinar will enable practitioners to greatly expand their skills and knowledge in the use of nail diagnosis in clinical practice. This webinar also aims to improve the skills of clinical examination in relation to nutritional deficiencies. This informative webinar will also be beneficial to students to consolidate their learning. PDF notes are included with the webinar.

Topics covered:
– Nail anatomy
– Nail signs (causes, nutritional deficiencies, clinical prescribing)
– Conditions and related nail signs
– Tissue salts/Celloids

Learning outcomes:
– Identify and describe nail signs
– Identify potential nutritional deficiencies in relation to nail signs and clinical examination
– Identify health conditions related to nail signs

Link to Nail Diagnosis webinar registration:

https://events.redbackconferencing.com.au/9e9f72

Link to other webinars:

https://www.facebook.com/optimum.mentoring/

Nail Diagnosis

Nails often reflect the general state of health and wellbeing of a person. It is known that systemic disease/s can produce changes in the nails. Detailed examination of the fingernails can provide indications of nutritional deficiencies and potential underlying systemic diseases. This brief video gives an overview of some of the nail signs encountered in clinical practice. The full comprehensive webinar will enable practitioners to greatly expand their skills and knowledge in the use of nail diagnosis in clinical practice.

For information on the full Nail Diagnosis webinar in May 2018, click on the link below.

Optimum Mentoring: https://www.facebook.com/optimum.mentoring/

Heart Week – Don’t get the sits

Heart Week is 29 April – 6 May and focuses on the benefits of physical activity and empowering Australians to get moving. Cardiovascular disease is a very serious health issue. It encompasses a wide range of cardiometabolic conditions, including Type 2 Diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, thrombosis, insulin resistance, among other health conditions, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Nutrition plays a fundamental role in optimum health.

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You might be shocked to know:

❤️ over half of Australians (52%) are not active enough

❤️ almost two in three Australian adults are overweight or obese

❤️ one in four children are overweight or obese

❤️ 5,000 Australians die per year from physical inactivity

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Australia is an inactive nation. Increasingly greater numbers of us are spending too much time sitting or being inactive.

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It’s time to do something to improve cardiovascular health:

💫 Eat good natural food. Have a predominantly vegetarian diet and utilising a Mediterranean diet. Paleo diet principles are good too.

💫 Consume plenty of fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds.

💫 Consume foods high in omega-3, magnesium, zinc, vitamin C, folate, B12, B6, fibre, among others.

💫 Consume less salt/sodium, refined carbohydrates, sugar-sweetened beverages, saturated fats. Consume no trans fats.

💫 Drink more water. Aim for 1.5-2 litres per day.

💫 Be physically active. We need 30 minutes of activity per day to be healthy.

💫 Consult a qualified nutritionist who will work out the best diet and nutrients for your health care needs. They will provide advice both for the short-term and long-term. Setting you up for a healthy life.

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It’s never too late to start now!

Weekends are for relaxing

Weekends are for relaxing. Find a nice, calm, quiet spot. Sit back, relax, yoga, read a good book, and take in all the beauty. Take a time out. Ahhh, Florence. You’ve done it again.

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ANZAC Day

Lest we forget

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.